EUROPEAN PAPERS ON THE NEW WELFARE

Category Archive for 'Paper No.09 /2008'

The Management of Active Ageing: From the Increasing of the Retirement Age to the New Risks of Employment among the Middle Aged

1. Introduction. On the Variety of Old Ages and the Lopsided Vision of the Policies

This paper is intended to contribute to the current general reflections on active ageing and in particular to the aspect concerning employment.
Read More

Stop and Go in the Italian Pension Reform Process

1. The Government — Unions Agreement: An Overall Evaluation

On July 27th, 2007 the Government and the Trade Unions reached an agreement (known as the ‘welfare protocol’) which has subsequently become a law proposal, submitted to Parliament and included, as a separate bill, in the 2008 financial law. The immediate goal of the bill is to prevent the former (2004) pension law from becoming effective, as originally stipulated, at the beginning of 2008, and consequently to avoid the rather abrupt increase in retirement age (three years) established by that reform, which would cause a sharp discontinuity of treatment between adjacent cohorts (the so-called ‘scalone’ — big step — as opposed to a smooth increase in retirement age).
Read More

Work and Pension in Sweden

1. An ageing Population — A Challenge for the Employment Policy

For several decades the share of older people in the population has gradually increased in the industrialised countries. This development started early in the Scandinavian countries, especially Sweden, but is now prevalent in all industrialised countries and also in many others. Table 1 shows the development between 1975 and 2000 in a number of countries and a forecast for development up to year 2030 made by the U.S. Department of Commerce and U.S. Census Bureau.
Read More

The Strategy of the Four Pillars in a Long-life Society

1. Introduction

The Four Pillars Programme of The Geneva Association is a research programme set up in 1987 with the aim of studying the key importance in the new service economy of Social Security, Insurance, Savings and Employment. The programme focuses on the future of pensions, welfare and employment. The main reasons for this programme have been:
Read More

Why the Young Generation Does not Care about the Long-Life Phenomenon — and Ways to Change This

1. Finding Out About the Young Generation’s Opinion on Long-Life Societies — Three Vain Attempts

A first, common-sense approach to finding out about the attitude of Western Europe‘s younger generation towards ageing and the long-life society is to have a look at NEON1. This monthly magazine is printed in an edition of roughly 300,000 copies and is mostly read by young adults between 20 and 30 of both sexes in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. NEON has a reputation for keeping track of the thinking and the attitudes of the younger generation. Rather astonishingly, there is hardly any coverage of ageing and the long-life issue in recent NEON editions. This fact is astonishing indeed because it will be precisely the generation between 20 and 30 who will experience the peak of the recent development towards ageing societies in all Western countries.
Read More

Health and Long-Term Living: Trends and Best Practices in Europe

1. Introduction

Whilst life expectancy at birth is increasing in the European Union (EU), health represents a key area of concern for European citizens. On the one hand, there are remarkable variations of life expectancy trends in the different Member States, which poses a great challenge for policy makers and for health systems to achieve equal health opportunities within all the European countries. On the other hand, the lengthening of life expectancy and the decrease of birth-rate are producing an increasingly ageing population which is normally associated with an increase in disability and chronic diseases and the consequent rise in the cost for health care, long-term care and pensions.
Read More

Functioning and Disability in Ageing Population in Europe: What Policy for which Interventions?

1. Ageing in Europe: Demographic Trends

With an ageing population, living longer and encountering more disabilities, there will be a need in Europe for valid and comparable longitudinal data on the health of both young and older adults in order to create a richer empirical basis for analysis and thus for policy planning and strategies development. The ageing of the populations of Europe is inevitable, given the trend toward healthier, more active and longer lives. In its Communication on the Demographic Future of Europe, the European Commission points to four salient demographic trends across Europe:
Read More

Health and Long-Term Living: Trends and Best Practices in Europe

The ageing process, in Italy, is a fairly recent phenomenon. Indeed in the last century, life expectancy tripled and fertility plummeted. These phenomena caused a radical change within the age structure of the Italian population, with a real overturning of the age pyramid, whereas in the past the pyramid was characterised by a wide bottom and a narrow top, nowadays the same pyramid appears to have a narrow bottom and a wide top.
Read More

Health and Ageing: The Case for Long-Term Care

1. Introduction

Ageing is a structuring trend affecting the global economy. Sometimes seen as being limited to industrialized countries, it is in fact worldwide and, in absolute values, concerns the emerging much more than the industrialised countries.
Read More

Between Compression and Shifting Mortality the Longevity Revolution

This paper focuses on the longevity revolution as part of a broader project called the ‘M Project’ in which my co-investigators are Siu Lan Cheung from China, Shiro Horiuchi from Japan but working in New York and Roger Thatcher from UK.
Read More

« Previous PageNext Page »