EUROPEAN PAPERS ON THE NEW WELFARE

Author Archive

The Graying of the Great Powers – Demography and Geopolitics in the 21st Century

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This part of our publication presents texts which are not original. They are motivated and written under various contexts: they provide an insight on the fact that the lenghtening of the life cycle is of greater and greater concern and interest in many different directions. The counter-ageing society is an issue which needs to be perceived on the basis of a true, practical as well as theoretical, multidisciplinary approach. On the basis of this larger vision, the work, activity and research of any specialist can be better appreciated and given value within the framework of a global background of reference.

Book Summary

In the spring of 2008, the Global Aging Initiative at the Center for Strategic and International Studies published the Graying of the Great Powers, an in-depth study of the geopolitical implications of ‘global aging’— the dramatic transformation in population age structures and growth rates being brought about by falling fertility and rising longevity worldwide. The viewpoint of the study is that of the United States in particular and of today’s developed countries in general. Its timeframe is roughly the next half-century, from today through 2050.
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The Greying of the Middle Kingdom: The Demographics and Economics of Retirement Policy in China

1. Introduction

China is about to undergo a stunning demographic transformation. Today, China is still a young society. In 2004, the elderly — here defined as adults aged 60 and over — make up just 11% of the population. By 2040, however, the UN projects that the share will rise to 28%, a larger elder share than it projects for the United States2 (see Fig. 1). In absolute numbers, the magnitude of China’s coming age wave is staggering. By 2040, assuming current demographic trends continue, there will be 397 million Chinese elders, which is more than the total current population of France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom combined.
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